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Chemistry Courses

Course Prerequisites 

Students who register for any chemistry class who have not satisfied the stated prerequisite(s) may be dropped from the class at the instructor’s discretion. Courses substituted for those specifically listed as prerequisites, including courses in allied areas, should be approved by the instructor prior to registration. Specific course prerequisites are listed in the course descriptions later in this section.

 


Placement

Math

Normal progress toward the bachelor’s degree in chemistry requires the completion of Mathematics 1210 (Calculus I) by the end of the freshman year, meaning that entering freshmen must be able to pass the University’s mathematics placement examination in college algebra. Otherwise, deficiencies in mathematics should be made up as soon as possible prior to entering the second year of study. Consult with the Mathematics and Physics departments for proper placement in courses based on performance on AP examinations in those subjects.

Chemistry

A score of 3 or 4 on the AP Chemistry Exam normally will earn 6 semester hours of credit, while a score of 5 will earn 8, equivalent to Chemistry 1210 and 1220. Students earning a 5 on the Chemistry AP exam may register for CHEM 1210, 1220, or 2310. Students earning a 4 on the Chemistry AP exam may register for either CHEM 1210 or 1220. However, students may wish to consult with Professor Charles Atwood at 801-581-4383, for proper placement. Preprofessional students should be aware that many professional schools may require one or both semesters of general chemistry, and also may encourage students to take additional upper-division chemistry courses. Such students should therefore consult with their preprofessional advisor concerning their course selection. Note that AP placement does not affect the requirement to take the accompanying lab classes, 1215 and 1225. Documentation of comparable lab experience may be presented to Professor Charles H. Atwood in order to place out of these labs.


Introductory Courses

CHEM 1010, 1020, 1030, 1040, and 1050 are designed for non-science majors and satisfy the University’s science intellectual explorations requirement. The CHEM 1110, 1120 sequence is primarily for students in nursing and other allied health areas requiring a one-year introductory sequence in general, organic, and biochemistry. This sequence also satisfies the science intellectual explorations requirement. CHEM 1200 is a preparatory course for students with a weak background in high school chemistry who plan to take the general chemistry sequence. CHEM 1208 and CHEM 2308 are completely online preparatory courses for General and Organic Chemistry, respectively. These courses are designed to help students review the basics and build the confidence required to succeed before entering the mainstream courses (1210 or 2310).

None of the above courses satisfy any requirements for the chemistry or other science majors.

Science majors should normally begin the general chemistry sequence with CHEM 1210 and its associated laboratory course, CHEM 1215. After satisfactory completion of these classes (grades of at least C-), the second semester classes may be taken, and subsequently, the organic chemistry (CHEM 2310, 2320, 2315, 2325) sequence. Students should be aware that some of these classes have their prerequisites enforced. Honors courses for the second semester of general chemistry (CHEM 1211, 1221) and for organic chemistry (CHEM 2311, 2321) may be identified by their course numbers, which end in one (1). In addition, the undergraduate research section for Honors students is numbered CHEM 4999.


General Requirements

Chemistry majors must complete all university wide graduation requirements, including those in the following areas: writing (WRTG 2010), intellectual explorations [eight 3-semester-hour courses with two in each of fine arts, humanities, physical and life sciences (courses in the chemistry major may satisfy this requirement), and social sciences], American institutions (one 3-semester-hour course from an approved list), international, and diversity (one 3-semester-hour course from an approved list). An appropriately chosen diversity course can double count as an intellectual explorations course. Any two 3-semester-hour mathematics courses numbered above 1100 will meet the 6-semester-hour quantitative/reasoning requirement (for example, the calculus sequence MATH 1210 and 1220). The communication/writing requirement is met by CHEM 3000, which is designated as a writing intensive course, as is CHEM 5700. However, we encourage students to consider upper-division writing courses such as WRTG 3400 (Professional Writing) to hone their skills in this important area. Those seeking the B.A. degree must complete 16 semester hours split evenly between first-year and second-year language courses. Most chemistry majors earn a B.S. degree, which requires 6 semester hours of upper-division quantitatively intensive courses (CHEM 3000, 3060, 3070, and 3090 meet these criteria).

The above section is designed to guide chemistry majors in meeting University graduation requirements, and does not supersede or replace any such rules. Students should consult with the University College, 450 SSB, for assistance in meeting these and other university wide requirements.

A minimum of 122 semester hours is required to graduate and at least 40 semester hours must be in upper-division courses numbered 3000 and above. Most of the chemistry degree programs require about 32 upper-division hours; thus, students should plan to take additional upper-division work in chemistry, physics, or mathematics, or in their general education courses to meet this 40-semester-hour standard. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 based on University of Utah work only is required by the University. In addition, the department requires a minimum GPA of 2.00 based on all courses taken in the College of Science at the University of Utah for the particular degree option chosen, and a minimum grade of C- in specific chemistry requirements. Transfer courses related to chemistry requirements should be at least a C. Generally, online chemistry classes will not be counted. A minimum of 12 upper-division semester hours of chemistry courses must be taken in residence at the University of Utah. Finally, all chemistry majors must pass four of the five departmental comprehensive exams in analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry, which are normally given a couple times each semester. These will normally be announced via e-mail to the chemistry majors list. Students may begin taking these exams following one full semester after completion of the 2300 level organic chemistry classes.


Course descriptions

Be advised, that this is NOT the official catalog. Pre-requisites are set to ensure student success.
 If you would like to make a plan it is best to meet with an advisor or refer to the University of Utah's Catalog

Below is a listing of the undergraduate courses with course descriptions; when a previous syllabus is available a link has been provided. Please be aware that the syllabi available on this site are only examples and do not necessarily represent the course requirements of the current professors. For the official University catalog, which has uptodate information about courses and requirements, please visit this site.

Wondering which semester courses are offered? See a summary of the class offerings or download a copy.

 

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(3) Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration
This is an online course. An introduction to the concepts of chemistry and the importance of these concepts in understanding environmental and health issues.

(3) Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration
This course presents basic principles of chemistry through discussions of consumer products, medicine, pollution, DNA, and synthetic fibers and plastics. Specific examples demonstrate general chemical principles.

(4) Cross listed as UGS 1040
An elementary knowledge of structure and bonding in organic chemistry will lead to an understanding of important biomolecules and some fundamental processes in the body. This knowledge will be used to study the mode of action of important classes of drugs such as birth control drugs, antibiotics and some illegal drugs. The course will finally focus on critical evaluation of scientific claims in the popular media (e.g. newspaper, world wide web). Related to this, students will learn to make a rational evaluation of the safety and efficacy of prescription drugs, herbal remedies, and dietary supplements. Case studies (e.g. phen-fen, olestra and St. John's Wort) will illustrate the important issues. Ultimately students will become better informed consumers of scientific and psuedo-scientific information.

 (3) An introduction to the history of energetic materials. This course will cover famous accidents, investigations, basic chemical properties of explosives and propellants, their detection, and strategies for countering terrorism.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(8) Summer chemistry program for high ability high-school students who have completed one year of chemistry. Six-week program involves eight hours of lecture and discussion, 15 hrs. of laboratory, and two seminar hours weekly. Enrollment limited and by invitation only.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(8) Summer chemistry program for high ability high-school students who have completed one year of chemistry. Six-week program involves eight hours of lecture and discussion, 15 hrs. of laboratory, and two seminar hours weekly. Enrollment limited and by invitation only.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(1) Advanced Placement (AP) laboratory program for high school students enrolled in AP courses. One hour of lecture and three hours of laboratory experience every two weeks during fall semester. Students must be recommended by high school AP teacher.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(1) Prerequisite: CHEM 1070 or equivalent. Continuation of CHEM 1070. Advanced Placement (AP) laboratory program for high school students enrolled in AP courses. One hour of lecture and three hours of laboratory experience every two weeks during spring semester. Students must be recommended by high school AP teacher.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Required Prerequisite: "B" or better in MATH 1010 or AP Chemistry score of 3+.
 Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration
Three lectures, one discussion section and 3 hour lab per week. The first of a two semester sequence (CHEM 1110 and 1120) intended as a broad introduction to chemistry primarily for students in nursing and allied health fields. CHEM 1110 consists of an introducion to general chemistry with an emphasis on the language of chemistry and quantitative problem-solving. The semester concludes with topics in introductory organic chemistry.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: CHEM 1110. Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration
Three lectures, one discussion section and 3 hour lab per week. CHEM 1120 completes the discussion of elementary organic chemistry and introduces the student to biochemistry.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus.

(3) Recommended Co-requisite: MATH 1050
Preparatory course for students who intend to take CHEM 1210 but feel their background or high school preparation is inadequate. Introduction to basic chemistry concepts with emphasis on problem solving.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: MATH 1050 and a grade of C- or better. Co-requisite: CHEM 1215. Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration
Three lectures, two discussions per week. Fundamentals of chemistry emphasizing descriptive and modern applied chemistry for science and engineering majors. Topics include atomic theory, molecular bonding, and reaction chemistry.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Co-requisite: CHEM 1240
Three lectures, two discussions weekly. Honors section of CHEM 1210. Content and level of treatment may differ somewhat from CHEM 1210. By invitation only; apply to instructor.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(1) Co-requisite: CHEM 1210
One lecture and one 3 hour lab per week. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 1210.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: CHEM 1210 or AP Chemisry Score of "4". 
Co-requisite: CHEM 1225. Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration

A continuation of CHEM 1210.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: CHEM 1210 and a grade of B or better and a GPA of 3.5 Co-requisite: CHEM 1241
Three lectures, two discussions weekly. Honors section of CHEM 1220. Content and level of treatment may differ somewhat from CHEM 1220. By invitation only; apply to instructor.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(1) Co-requisite: CHEM 1220
One lecture per week, one three-hour laboratory/discussion per week. (Must be taken concurrently with Chem. 1220.)

(1) Co-requisite: CHEM 1211
Honors section of CHEM 1215. Content and level of treatment may differ somewhat from CHEM 1215.

(1) Co-requisite: CHEM 1221
Honors section of CHEM 1225. Content and level of treatment may differ somewhat from CHEM 1225.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: CHEM 1220 or AP Chemistry Score of 5. Co-requisite: CHEM 2315
Topics include reactions of organic molecules, shapes of molecules, and spectroscopic methods of identifying organic molecules.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: CHEM 1220 with a grade of B or better and a GPA of 3.5 Co-requisite: CHEM 2325

Honors section of Organic Chemistry I. Content and level of treatment may differ somewhat from CHEM 2310. By invitation only; apply to instructor.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(1) Co-requisite: CHEM 2310 or (CHEM 2311)

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(4) Prerequisite: CHEM 2310. Co-requisite: CHEM 2325
A continuation of Organic Chemistry I emphasizing reaction chemistry and mechanisms of reactions.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: CHEM 2311 Co-requisite: CHEM 2325
Honors section of CHEM 2320. Content and level of treatment may differ somewhat from CHEM 2320.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(1) Co-requisite: CHEM 2320 or (CHEM 2321)

(1) A distance-learning course offered entirely online, this offering teaches skills in MathCad, a commercial mathematics and graphing program. Most of the examples and assignments are framed in the context of chemistry problems.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: "C-" or better in MATH 1220 AND CHEM 1220 or (CHEM 1221 or HONOR 1221). Recommended Prerequisite MATH 1220 or equivalent.
Fulfills Quantitative Intensive & Communication/Writing

Two lectures and two 4 hour labs per week. Principles of quantitative analysis, stoichiometry, equilibrium theory, and volumetric and gravimetric analysis. Introduction to instrumental analysis.

(2) Recommended Prerequisite: CHEM 1220
Lecture portion of CHEM 3000. Chemistry majors must take CHEM 3000.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: MATH 2210 and PHYS 2220 and one of CHEM 1220 or 1221 or HONOR 1221. Recommended Prerequisite: MATH 2250. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
Topics include quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, and microscopic kinetics.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(4) Prerequisite: MATH 2210 and PHYS 2220 and one of CHEM 1220 or 1221 or HONOR 1221. Recommended Prerequisite: MATH 2250. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
Topics include kinetics, thermodynamics, state changes, electrochemistry, and crystal and diffraction techniques.

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(4) Cross listed as BIOEN 5090. Prerequisite: MATH 2210 and PHYS 2220 and one of CHEM 1220 or 1221 or HONOR 1221. Recommended Prerequisite: MATH 2250. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
Emphasizes biological and biochemical aspects of physical chemistry.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(5) Prerequisite: CHEM 1220 or (CHEM 1221 or HONOR 1221). Recommended Co-requisites: CHEM 2310 and 3060
Current theoretical models for correlation of inorganic systems, review of major chemical trends across the periodic table, oxidation states of elements, oxidation-reduction equilibria, and acid-base equilibria. Introduction to inorganic stereochemistry including symmetry fundamentals, coordination compounds and crystal field theory, organometallic compounds, and electron-deficient molecules.

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(2) Prerequisite: CHEM 1210, 1220, 2310, 2320
Meets with CHEM 7130. Course requirements will be tailored differently for graduate and undergraduate students. Chem 3130 focuses on fundamental aspects as well as contemporary and classical solid-state chemistry. Topics include an overview of solid-state chemistry particularly in relation to physics and materials science, and the preparation and characterization of solids with emphasis their uniqueness with respect to organic/inorganic molecular compounds. The structures and bonding and physical properties of solids will be surveyed with a focus toward the unique attributes of solids.

Representative examples of materials ranging from classical 3-D network oxides to molecular solids as well as polymer will illustrate key concepts. Basic concepts and state-of-the art controversies and limitations will be highlighted in the course.

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(3) Prerequisite: Chem 1210, 1215, 1220, 1225 (or honors versions)
Radiochemistry courses are only sporadically offered around the world. The renaissance in nuclear engineering around the globe points toward its revitalization through support from major nuclear agencies and vendors. This course will give students an understanding of what radiochemistry is, how and where it applies, and how one can become a radiochemist.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(3) Cross listed as BIOL 3510. Prerequisite: BIOL 2020, 2030, CHEM 2320
Structure and function of biomolecules, metabolism, and regulation.

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(3) Cross listed as BIOL 3515. Recommended Prerequisite: CHEM 3510 or BIOL 3510
Laboratory designed to follow or be taken concurrently with CHEM/BIOL 3520. One hour lecture and one 4-hour lab per week.

PDF fileSee sample syllabus

(3) Cross listed as BIOL 3520. Recommended Prerequisite: BIOL 3510 or CHEM 3510
A continuation of Biological Chemistry I. Nucleic acid structure, protein and nucleic acid biosynthesis and signal transduction.

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(3) Cross listed as BIOL 3525. Recommended Prerequisite: CHEM 3510 or BIOL 3510
From the simplest bacterium to multicellular mammals, each living organism shares vital mechanisms to repair its DNA. In this lab course, we will explore the structure of DNA, mechanisms of DNA damage, consequences of un-repaired DNA damage, and how cells repair DNA.

(1 to 4) Participation in the ongoing research of any one of our faculty members.

(1 to 4) Prerequisite: Must be working on a departmental honors degree
Participate in the ongoing research of any of Chemistry's faculty members.

(1) Prerequisite: Must be working on a departmental honors degree
Required for students who intend to graduate with honors in Chemistry. Content may vary, but will include both formal and informal oral and written presentations of research by dept. honors students as well as attendance at other dept. presentations.

(3) Prerequisite: Restricted to Honors Program
Restricted to students in the Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

(1 to 4) For elementary and secondary school teachers specializing in science. Content varies.

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(2) Prerequisite: CHEM 3000. Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing
Two lectures, two laboratories a week for 7.5 weeks. Introduction to advanced laboratory work in chemistry. Modern instrumental techniques including electrochemical, spectroscopic, and chromatographic analysis.

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(2) Prerequisite: CHEM 2320 or 2321
Two lectures, two laboratories a week for 7.5 weeks. Laboratory emphasizing the use of modern instrumental techniques for the identification and characterization of organic compounds.

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(2) Prerequisite: CHEM 3060. Recommended Co-requisite CHEM 3070 or 3090
Two lectures, two laboratories per week for 7.5 weeks. Experimental study of selected aspects of physical chemistry, with emphasis on quantitative techniques.

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(2) Recommended Co-requisite: CHEM 3100
Two lectures and two laboratories per week for 7.5 weeks.

Laboratory emphasizing the synthesis, characterization and reactivity of inorganic molecules for modern energy applications. Students learn about inorganic photochemistry and study hydrogen evolving catalysts, OLEDs, and dye-sensitized solar cells

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(3) Cross listed as BIOL 5810, PHYS 5810
An introduction to the emerging fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Concepts from biology, chemistry and physics will be used to explore the special features of phenomena at the nanometer scale, and current developments in the design and construction of nanoscale devices will be discussed. Course requirements include a research paper.

 

Last Updated: 12/20/16